Research shows – sports can be distracting at work

soccerRobert Half did some research  and the data shows sports does impact productivity at work. On the day after big sporting events large percentages of people call in sick or are late to work.  The over 1000 workers surveyed admitted to spending about 27 minutes a day on sports-related activities before a major sporting event.  Olympics, March Madness, World Cup Soccer, and NBA playoffs are just a few major sporting events that are particularly popular and just on the horizon.

But it’s not all bad news.  Sports can also contribute to teamwork.  We focus on sport as a way to get everyone involved in a common activity, to come together and celebrate. We have an office fantasy football league.  We’ve been known to play some World Cup games on our big screen too. Lunch time and afternoon tea break (yes, come visit, we have tea in the afternoons) can coincide with sporting events or be the time to manage that fantasy team.

You don’t have to loose the productivity, instead look for ways to foster teamwork and impact morale!

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Millennials Want Your Brand to be Authentic

This HuffPost article isn’t brand new but the points are ones heard from many arenas. Matthew Tyson’s article is titled “Millennials Want Brands To Be More Authentic. Here’s Why That Matters.”.  He talks about how millennials are not influenced by traditional advertising and they will soon be the group with the largest market impact. That matters. Firms will need to evolve and work with this changing reality. Tyson says millennials want to be engaged and they want brands to be authentic.

Tyson goes on to give his view of what companies can  do to be more authentic. His recommendations are for companies to communicate more, be transparent, be relevant, and to care. It’s a quick read but within each category he raises some interesting points.

How is your firm addressing the evolving marketing place?  Share with us how your firm is changing to stay relevant for millennials, we’re interested to learn from your experiences.

Nothing like a little competition!

smiley stickersSometimes a little friendly competition helps bring some new energy to a task you may have done before. Who says sticker charts are just for kids!

For many of our clients we have a focus on recruiting new advocates into their program.  Ensuring a robust program membership is the key to finding the right customer for upcoming opportunities. We’ve decided to inject a little competition into the recruiting process for one of our clients.

Sparkly smiley face stickers are climbing up a chart.  Three of our team members are in a bit of a race to see who will recruit more advocates this month.  It’s fun and it makes the progress visible to everyone.  And the person who recruits the most wins bragging rights though when we have other competitions sometimes they have prizes!

How do you put a little fun into your work?

Great article, full of interviewing tips

We are interviewing our clients and their customers all the time.  Each discussion about how our role with the client might expand is really an interview.  Each call with a potential advocacy program member is an interview.  Lots of them, every day. This article from the Content Marketing Institute, written by Clare McDermott, “Perfecting The Art of the One-on-One Interview”, is full of useful ideas and links to even more ideas.

McDermott divides the article into sections: how to prepare for the interview, how to begin the interview, and how to hit your stride.  Each section has great information. Depending on your level of interview experience this may serve as a refresher or be full of new information. We’re sure that even the expert interviewers among you will learn something new.  Reading this article is well worth your time. 

Let us know what you learned or how the article reinforced something you’ve always thought important. Leave a comment, below.

Personas – mistakes to avoid

Do you use personas to help shape your content and programs?  This article by Jessica Vionas on the Business2Community site points out some traps to avoid as you are developing buyer personas. Mistake number one is making assumptions.  Many of us have been guilty of that, especially if you do not have funds for research.  Ideally you would be able to interview a subset of your customers rather than rely solely on market research.  Just don’t skip research! Use that knowledge to create fact based, not assumption based, personas.

Once you begin to develop your personas the article suggests not slicing and dicing too finely.  How many personas do you really need?  What differentiates one persona from another?  Roles are often used but is it really the role the person is in or is it the challenges they face which are the key differentiators of your various personas?

We hope the last mistake covered in the article is not true for you – creating personas and then not using them!  As the articles says, that is “just silly”.  I suspect some might have even stronger language for that situation!

Do you have fact based personas that you use as you develop content and programs?  Share your experiences in how they have helped you be successful. 

Holiday Volunteering

HealthTrust 2017Volunteering as a team during the holidays is a Referential tradition. As we did last year, we sorted food with the FOODBasket Food Sorting team of The Health Trust.  We sorted and helped with storage and display of fresh produce which is offered to their AIDS Services and Family Resource Center clients.  The photo shows just part of the food we helped process. We are in the heart of Silicon Valley, a place of great wealth, but also of great need, as this paragraph from The Health Trust website makes crystal clear:

Silicon Valley is a place of innovation, opportunity and affluence. On average, it is one of the healthiest, wealthiest places in the world. But not all residents of Silicon Valley share in that wealth – or that health. More than 13 percent of children in Santa Clara County are living in poverty. More than half of the adults are overweight or obese. Nearly half of the county’s older adults are considered impoverished. More than 19,000 adults and youth are homeless. 

Our time as a team is one way we can help contribute to their vision of a healthier Silicon Valley for everyone.